Stuff.co.nz - Cricket

Nov 252016
 

New Zealand opener Jeet Raval battled hard on the opening day of the second test against Pakistan in Hamilton.

PHOTOSPORT

New Zealand opener Jeet Raval battled hard on the opening day of the second test against Pakistan in Hamilton.

Brighter conditions indicated there should be more play on Saturday than there was on the opening day of the second cricket test between New Zealand and Pakistan in Hamilton.

Only 21 overs were possible due to rain at Seddon Park on Friday, as New Zealand reached 77-2 after being sent in by the tourists.

Rookie opener Jeet Raval was unbeaten on 35 while Ross Taylor, who is scheduled to have an eye operation on Wednesday following the completion of the two-test series, had raced to 29 off just 20 balls before rain forced the players from the field before 1pm.

Black Caps batsman Ross Taylor made a rapid start to his innings.

PHOTOSPORT

Black Caps batsman Ross Taylor made a rapid start to his innings.

Play started on Saturday at the earlier time of 10:30am to make up for some of the lost time on Friday.

READ MORE:
* Full coverage: NZ v Pakistan – second test
* Scorecard: Black Caps v Pakistan
* Learn about new NZ quick Lockie Ferguson

* Meet Black Caps’ new weapon
* Ronchi ‘New Zealand’s best No 5’
* DRS decision flummoxes captain Kane

The Black Caps lead the two-test series 1-0 after winning the first test in Christchurch.

 – Stuff

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Live: Black Caps v Pakistan – second test, day two

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Nov 252016
 
Black Caps v Pakistan second test, day two - scorecard

Last updated 10:15, November 26 2016

Pakistan captain Azhar Ali of Pakistan calls for a umpire review in the second test against the Black Caps, at Seddon ...

Dave Rowland/ Getty Images

Pakistan captain Azhar Ali of Pakistan calls for a umpire review in the second test against the Black Caps, at Seddon Park in Hamilton.

The scorecard from day two of the second test between the Black Caps and Pakistan, at Seddon Park in Hamilton.

COMMENTARY:
Black Caps v Pakistan

BALL-BY-BALL:
Scorer’s account

 – Stuff

Nov 252016
 
New Black Caps bowler clocked 155kmh: 'It was coming out OK that day'

MARK GEENTY

Last updated 10:08, November 26 2016

Lockie Ferguson was clocked at 153kmh and 155kmh during pre-season matches at Lincoln.

WILLIAM BOOTH/PHOTOSPORT

Lockie Ferguson was clocked at 153kmh and 155kmh during pre-season matches at Lincoln.

Bowling fast to a big crowd had Lockie Ferguson hooked before he’d even left school.

As a 16-year-old, before a near full house at Wellington’s Basin Reserve during an England cricket test in 2008, Ferguson chased the title of New Zealand’s quickest secondary school bowler.

An original field of 600, in a nationwide search to find the new Shane Bond, was whittled down to the final few.

A 16-year-old Lockie Ferguson at a 2008 national schools fast bowling competition alongside future Black Caps Jimmy ...

DAVE LINTOTT/PHOTOSPORT

A 16-year-old Lockie Ferguson at a 2008 national schools fast bowling competition alongside future Black Caps Jimmy Neesham, right, and Ben Wheeler, left, at the Basin Reserve.

He ran second, by 1kmh. His conqueror, an Auckland Grammar schoolmate one year ahead, is now a New Zealand team-mate who’ll join Ferguson on the plane to Australia next week to defend the Chappell-Hadlee Trophy.

READ MORE:
Meet Black Caps’ new weapon

Ronchi ‘New Zealand’s best No 5’
DRS decision flummoxes captain Kane

Fast bowling is a tough gig, says Lockie Ferguson. "You get given a bit of talent in terms of bowling those speeds but ...

PHOTOSPORT

Fast bowling is a tough gig, says Lockie Ferguson. “You get given a bit of talent in terms of bowling those speeds but being able to do it for a long time and actually stay on the park is a whole other ball game.”

“Jimmy [Neesham] actually pipped me,” Ferguson recalled.

“That was pretty cool, during a test match down there and we had a full crowd surrounding our run-ups. It was the first time I’d experienced anything like that.

“In the final I was 132kmh and he got 133 with his last ball. He bowled a beamer and he beat me. That’s how things go, he was sort of my big brother through school.”

The speed gun and Ferguson have flirted ever since, with New Zealand Cricket nodding in approval from afar. In September at Lincoln, for the Emerging Players pre-season matches against the New Zealand XI, the radar confirmed what everyone knew. He can be rapid with Kookaburra in hand.

“They had some software there and I don’t know how accurate it was, but I got clocked at 155kmh and 153 which I was pretty happy with. It was coming out OK that day.”

The ability to bowl fast is only gifted to a few. Genetics gave Ferguson a strong headstart, with mother Jan a sprinter and netballer and father Doug a rugby playing sporting allrounder.

And in echoes of Ben Wheeler, another future Black Cap who contested that school fast bowling competition, Ferguson scrapped in brutal backyard tests against an older sibling.

Brother Mitch, four years older, was a star at Auckland Grammar.

“My brother was a quick bowler and naturally I wanted to be better than him. Since I was a young fella I tried to bowl quick. I opened the batting too and tried for the best of both worlds.

“I used to play a lot of cricket with his mates, playing against the older boys and we had a lot of very competitive, aggressive backyard battles for sure.”

Young Lockie was pitched into the first XI at the end of the fourth form, his pace already turning heads.

But no fast bowler’s story is complete without injuries. Ferguson rattles off a few: stress fracture at 18, side strains, torn obliques. Then there was one he thought had ended his career in the 2012-13 season, caused by his back foot landing on his toes.

“I had a foot blowout which was apparently a freak accident. The pressure of one spike must have gone through the joint capsule and it burst and basically messed up all the soft tissue on my right foot.

“I had surgery and was out for four months and there was a lot of talk I might not be able to play again because it might keep blowing out. It took a bit to come back from that, with the rehab and then I was just lucky in the sense that it’s holding up allright.”

At age 25 Ferguson’s career comprises just 22 first-class matches, 14 Twenty20s and eight list-A (50-over) matches. His list-A debut for Auckland was on December 27, 2015 (he took 16 wickets at 28 in eight matches). Less than a year later he could be bowling for the Black Caps in Sydney, Canberra or Melbourne.

“I’ve worked hard at it [bowling fast] for a long time. You get given a bit of talent in terms of bowling those speeds but being able to do it for a long time and actually stay on the park is a whole other ball game.

“I’m fortunate that I have been able to stay on the park lately because I have battled injuries in the past. I try and bowl as fast as I can as accurately as I can. Speed is a big weapon for me so I want to use that to the best of my ability just like guys use swing.”

The topic of short-pitched bowling and intimidation is a sensitive one, with a spotlight on concussion and batsman safety. A Ferguson bouncer sidelined Otago’s Ryan Duffy this season, then he received a wakeup call when clanged on the helmet by Canterbury’s Ed Nuttall last week. It’s a tricky but regular discussion topic among the fast bowlers’ club.

“Part of the game is we want to be aggressive and we don’t want the batsman to be comfortable and if it means bowling short to muck up their footwork and put them out of position then that’s what we’ve got to do to win the game.

“Obviously hitting them in the head, we don’t want them to be hurt. A few dents and a few bruises is all good, that can heal. Anything further than that, we don’t want any long term damage. It is a bit touchy but I don’t think it takes away from how we play the game.”

Former Black Cap Andre Adams – another supremely gifted cricketer, straight shooter and combative individual on the field – is now his trusted mentor. They honed his action which has a bit of Adams about it, a medium pace run-up, pause then snap of the shoulder, seam and bounce his weapons at a speed quicker than anyone in New Zealand. It’s reaped him 18 Plunket Shield wickets at 22 this season.

Said Ferguson of Adams, the Auckland bowling coach: “We didn’t hit it off at the start, we butted heads a little bit and then we became good mates. We’ve got similar personalities. He’s been a huge help, just keeps things simple.”

Ferguson’s his own man, too. Lauchlan became Lockie as a youngster because he liked the unconventional spelling. He completed a business degree in marketing and worked in advertising – including work on the NZC account – before the on-field action became his fulltime focus. Newly announced in the Black Caps he was one of the best interviews you’d hear from a newcomer. No media training required here.

That big goal of cracking the international ranks was ticked off when Ferguson missed a call from selector Gavin Larsen on Thursday morning before taking the field for Auckland in Rangiora.

“You always dream of getting that phone call and when it happened it was like ‘s..t this is real’.

“I had to keep it quiet all day, and not even tell my family and I thought ‘you’re killing me’. But it was all good and I managed to tell the family on [Thursday] night and tell them to keep it secret.”

That was tough for father Doug, a golf nut who was in Melbourne’s Kingston Heath for the World Cup of Golf and took a call from his excited son. “He was on the 17th hole and he was like ‘you beauty’ and I could hear the golf going on in the background. He was pretty happy.”

Now with Adam Milne sidelined, Ferguson is the fastest gun in black, selected to provide a point of difference in a land that churns out fast bowlers like a production line. He’s excited, knows nerves will be a factor but won’t be overawed if summoned.

“It’s the ultimate challenge and I’m pretty excited to play on some Aussie pitches that hopefully have pace and bounce. I’m confident of competing with these guys and our squad has some serious talent.”

And, at last, some serious speed.

 – Stuff

Nov 252016
 
Zimbabwe edge out West Indies to reach ODI tri-series final

Last updated 08:38, November 26 2016

Zimbabwe all-rounder Sean Williams.

QUINN ROONEY/GETTY IMAGES

Zimbabwe all-rounder Sean Williams.

Zimbabwe have beaten the West Indies by five runs on the Duckworth-Lewis method to book a place in the final of the triangular one-day international tournament, to be played against Sri Lanka.

Rain ended the last round-robin match early on Thursday after Zimbabwe fought back from a dismal start to post a competitive score and pegged the Windies back to 124 for five in the 28th over when play was halted.

Sikander Raza and Tendai Chisoro shared a record ninth-wicket stand of 84 to lift Zimbabwe to 218 for eight off 49 overs after rain had interrupted the early stages of the match in Bulawayo.

Zimbabwe had been reeling at 63 for five but Raza led a revival and finished 76 not out while number 10 Chisoro made 42 not out off 35 balls.

READ MORE:
* Kane Williamson flummoxed by DRS dismissal 
Art of ball tampering: How to give bowlers an advantage
* Khawaja steps up for Australia in day-night test v Proteas
* The Black Caps’ new 150kmh weapon – Lockie Ferguson

Chisoro removed both West Indian openers in his first two overs before Jonathan Carter (43 not out) led a fight back, thwarted by heavy showers, and ultimately narrowly behind in the run rate.

Sri Lanka’s close-fought win over the West Indies on Wednesday secured their place in the final.

 – Reuters

Nov 252016
 
England captain Alastair Cook seeks clarity from ICC on ball-shining practice

AMLAN CHAKRABORTY

Last updated 02:58, November 26 2016

Alastair Cook: "Players are slightly uncertain at the moment, what is acceptable and what is not acceptable."

DANISH SIDDIQUI/REUTERS

Alastair Cook: “Players are slightly uncertain at the moment, what is acceptable and what is not acceptable.”

The age-old practice of shining the cricket ball has become a “grey area” and the game’s governing body must provide clarity to end the prevailing confusion, England captain Alastair Cook said on Friday.

The method, ostensibly to generate more swing with the ball with one shiny side, has come under scrutiny after South Africa captain Faf du Plessis was declared guilty of ball-tampering by the International Cricket Council (ICC) earlier this week.

Television footage appeared to show du Plessis applying saliva to the ball while sucking on a sweet during the Hobart test against Australia but the Proteas captain has decided to appeal the ICC decision which cost him his entire match fees.

England paceman Chris Woakes rued lack of clarity on the issue on Thursday and his views were echoed by Cook ahead of their third test against India beginning on Saturday.

READ MORE: The art of ball-tampering in cricket

“I think Woakesey summed up quite nicely yesterday, it is a bit of a grey area at the moment,” Cook told reporters at the Punjab Cricket Association (PCA) stadium.

“Players are slightly uncertain at the moment, what is acceptable and what is not acceptable. I haven’t studied Faf’s case that closely to see if he was taking the sweet straight to the ball or did he just happen to have a lolly in his mouth.

“I think the players are now, after the last 10 days, probably just looking to the ICC to clarify what is acceptable and what is not acceptable.”

Cook was not sure how much it actually helped but preferred clearer guidelines.

“If they said you aren’t allowed to directly put your finger from the sweet onto the ball, it might clear it up,” he added.

His India counterpart Virat Kohli was accused by a section of British media of shining the ball with sugary saliva in the first test at Rajkot even though no charges were levelled against him.

“If I was doing something, ICC would have spoken to me,” Kohli told reporters, calling such allegations a ploy to distract his team.

“I think it’s just to take the focus away from the series, to be honest,” said Kohli whose team have a 1-0 lead in the five-match series.

“It happened in Australia when South Africa won the series. I’m surprised the issue, what I’ve been told, came up in Rajkot but there was no mention of it until we saw the result in Vizag.

“I don’t read newspapers. I was told five days after the thing came out and I just laughed it off. I don’t pay attention to all those things.

“It’s just that some people are trying to take the focus away from the series, good luck to them. We are totally focused on what we have to do in this game.”

 – Reuters

Nov 252016
 
Usman Khawaja hits century as Australia take the lead in Adelaide

Last updated 01:09, November 26 2016

Steve Smith was well short of his ground after a dreadful mix-up

JASON REED/REUTERS

Steve Smith was well short of his ground after a dreadful mix-up



Usman Khawaja hit his country’s first century of the series and Peter Handscomb a half-century on debut as Australia reached 307-6 with a lead of 48 at end of the second day of the day-night third test against South Africa on Friday.

Khawaja’s magnificent 285-ball 138 not out was the glue in Australia’s innings, the left-hander putting on 137 with Steve Smith until his captain was calamitously run out and then 99 with Handscomb.

Australian batsman Usman Khawaja celebrates reaching 50 on day two of the third test at Adelaide Oval.

MORNE DE KLERK/GETTY IMAGES

Australian batsman Usman Khawaja celebrates reaching 50 on day two of the third test at Adelaide Oval.

Sean Abbott (3-38), who took two wickets in the first hour, returned to dismiss Handscomb before Kagiso Rabada bowled another debutant, Nic Maddinson, for a duck and Vernon Philander removed Matt Wade for four.

Khawaja will resume with Mitchell Starc (16 not out) on day three as the hosts look to extend their lead and put themselves in a commanding position to get the result they need to avoid a first ever 3-0 series sweep on home soil.

READ MORE:
Art of ball tampering: How to give bowlers an advantage
Full coverage: Black Caps v Pakistan – second test
Scorecard: Black Caps v Pakistan – second test
Black Caps eye series win at Seddon Park
Sneak peek: Seddon Park pitch
Hamilton hot shots, the stars of Seddon Park
Ferguson poised for Black Caps call

Australian David Warner of Australia walks off after getting out to South Africa pace bowler Kyle Abbott.

MORNE DE KLERK/GETTY IMAGES

Australian David Warner of Australia walks off after getting out to South Africa pace bowler Kyle Abbott.

Now 29, Khawaja has been recalled and discarded with regularity since his debut in 2011 but was retained for Adelaide despite the clearout that followed the humiliating innings and 80-run defeat in Hobart.

After opening in place of David Warner in the wake of South Africa’s declaration on 259-9 on Thursday, he negotiated a difficult opening hour on Friday before mixing fierce concentration with some typically elegant strokes.

He brought up his 50 with back-to-back fours and his fifth test century with a 10th boundary cut through point, whipping off his helmet to take the applause of another big crowd at Adelaide Oval.

Smith, dropped earlier by Hashim Amla, had departed for 59 just before his partner reached the milestone, tearing off for an optimistic single and left stranded as Khawaja stood his ground and Quinton de Kock removed the bails.

Handscomb, brought into the side on the back of a double century for Victoria, proved a more than able partner, however, and any prospect of another Australian batting collapse quickly dissipated.

The 25-year-old survived a scare when he just dived back into the crease ahead of a direct hit from Temba Bavuma but opened the following over with two drives and a pull for three fours that got him to his fifty and gave Australia the lead.

It was the outstanding Abbott who ended Handscomb’s maiden test innings by bowling the Victorian through the gate an hour into the night session.

The 29-year-old, who came into the side in the second test for the injured Dale Steyn and took 6-77, started the day with a brilliant exhibition of disciplined seam bowling, finishing with figures of 2-7 and six maidens in his first 10-over spell.

Australia resumed on 14-0 but debutant Matt Renshaw was only able to add two runs to his overnight tally before he was brilliantly caught for 10 at third slip by Dean Elgar.

That brought to the crease Warner, who was unable to open as usual on Thursday after Proteas skipper Faf du Plessis’s calculated declaration caught him off the field having treatment on his shoulder.

Warner failed to thrive at number three and was dismissed for 11 when he got an edge off an Abbott delivery that was seaming away from him, with Elgar once again snaffling the catch in the cordon.

 – Reuters

Nov 252016
 
Ed Nuttall steers Canterbury to Plunket Shield win over Auckland

BRENDON EGAN

Last updated 19:12, November 25 2016

Ed Nuttall took a five wicket bag to lead Canterbury to victory.

Chris Symes

Ed Nuttall took a five wicket bag to lead Canterbury to victory.

Left-arm quick Ed Nuttall ripped through the Auckland lower order to lead Canterbury to a thrilling 10-run Plunket Shield victory on Friday.

Set 361 to win from 85 overs at just over four an over, Auckland were well placed in their run chase at Rangiora’s Mainpower Oval.

They looked comfortable with former Canterbury gloveman Brad Cachopa and Mark Chapman at the crease, but lost their last six wickets for 60 runs.

Luke Ronchi smacked 119 not out for Wellington against Otago in their rain-affected draw.

Chris Skelton

Luke Ronchi smacked 119 not out for Wellington against Otago in their rain-affected draw.

Nuttall picked up four of those to finish with 5-67 in the second innings.

READ MORE:
*Chad Bowes scores ton to propel Canterbury into box seat against Auckland in Plunket Shield match
*Jamieson snares rare eight-for
*Late wickets boost Canterbury

Paceman Kyle Jamieson completed a memorable match, dismissing injured Robbie O’Donnell, who batted in the unaccustomed No11 spot, to seal the win.

Jamieson took 3-86 in the second innings to finish with outstanding match figures of 11-160 after taking eight first innings wickets.

Cachopa was left stranded on 75 not out.

Canterbury looked to have turned the match their way when Nuttall produced a ripper to knock over Black Caps’ batsman Colin Munro’s off stump, leaving Auckland 162-4.

Cachopa and Hong Kong international Chapman regained the initiative, adding 128 for the fifth wicket.

Nuttall was the man to produce the key breakthrough forcing Chapman into a mistake, skying one to Jack Boyle to depart for 81.

Cachopa and Tarun Nethula combined for a handy 50-wicket seventh wicket partnership, appearing to have put Auckland back in control.

Once Nethula went, Auckland folded with their final three batsmen all going cheaply.

Opener Michael Guptill-Bunce [67] and first class debutant Sean Solia [48] helped lay a solid platform early in the innings, but it ultimately proved in vain.

In other round five matches, Northern Districts held on for a gritty draw against Central Districts in Napier.

Competition leaders ND were set a whopping 450 to win and managed to stoically bat out 129 overs in their second dig.

Nick Kelly led the resistance, scoring a patient 56 not out from 229 deliveries as ND got through to 295-7.

Last summer’s leading Plunket Shield run-scorer Bharat Popli contributed 60 for the Knights, getting past 50 for the first time in this season’s competition.

CD’s bowling unit had to soldier on without Doug Bracewell, who was called into New Zealand’s second test squad, but wasn’t required in the playing 11 against Pakistan.

Unwanted Black Caps’ wicketkeeper-batsman Luke Ronchi took out his frustration on the Otago bowlers after missing out on the Chappell-Hadlee one-day squad to face Australia, starting next Sunday.

Wellington’s Ronchi blasted 119 not out from 109 balls, including 13 fours and three sixes, on the final day of a weather-affected match at Dunedin’s University Oval.

The Firebirds declared at 350-7 in reply to Otago first innings total of 208, gaining maximum batting points.

The Plunket Shield takes a break for domestic Twenty20 and one-day action, resuming again in late February.

AT A GLANCE: 

At Rangiora: Canterbury 245 all out and 400-7 decl (Chad Bowes 155, Jack Boyle 81, Peter Fulton 72; Tarun Nethula 5-128) beat Auckland 285 all out and 350 all out (Mark Chapman 81, Brad Cachopa 75no, Michael Guptill-Bunce 67, Sean Solia 48; Ed Nuttall 5-67, Kyle Jamieson 3-86) by 10 runs.

At Napier: Central Districts 225 all out and 377-5 decl (Tom Bruce 115, Dane Cleaver 108no, Ben Smith 70, Greg Hay 45) drew with Northern Districts 153 all out and 295-7 (Bharat Popli 60, Nick Kelly 56no, Scott Kuggeleijn 37, Henry Cooper 34)

At Dunedin: Otago 208 all out (Michael Bracewell 43, Brad Wilson 33, Hamish Rutherford 31; Jeetan Patel 6-55) drew with Wellington 350-7 decl (Luke Ronchi 119no, Matt McEwan 56, Michael Papps 47, Stephen Murdoch 43) 

 – Stuff

Nov 252016
 
Booing Faf went too far: Aussie boss

Last updated 18:43, November 25 2016

South Africa captain Faf du Plessis was disappointed with the crowd reaction to his century in Adelaide.

JASON REED/REUTERS

South Africa captain Faf du Plessis was disappointed with the crowd reaction to his century in Adelaide.

Fans went too far by booing South African captain Faf du Plessis’ century, Cricket Australia chief executive James Sutherland says.

Du Plessis was jeered by the Adelaide Oval crowd throughout his ton against Australia in the third Test on Thursday, and particularly when he reached the milestone.

The Proteas’ skipper said he expected some hostility after being found guilty by the International Cricket Council of ball tampering.

Faf du Plessis in thought during his press conference on Wednesday.

Ryan Pierse/Getty Images

Faf du Plessis in thought during his press conference on Wednesday.

But he was disappointed the booing continued when he scored his century – and Sutherland agreed.

READ MORE:
The art of ball tampering: How to give bowlers an advantage on the cricket field
Full coverage: Black Caps v Pakistan – second test
Scorecard: Black Caps v Pakistan – second test
Black Caps eye series win at Seddon Park
Sneak peek: Seddon Park pitch
Hamilton hot shots, the stars of Seddon Park
Ferguson poised for Black Caps call

“It’s a little bit of theatrics … he batted beautifully and I don’t think he deserved any boos after a great hundred like that,” Sutherland told ABC radio on Friday.

“That is sport and maybe just a little bit of fun that people in the crowd are having.

“But perhaps that fun just went a little bit too far at the end.”

Du Plessis will appeal his ball-tampering verdict, which resulted in a fine of his entire match fee from the second Test and three demerit points.

“I was expecting a little bit of hostility but not to that extent,” du Plessis told reporters after play on Thursday night.

“When I came out, I was obviously quite aware of it. As the innings went on, it disappeared a bit.

“But to be really honest with you guys, when I got to 100, I wasn’t expecting to still get booed. So that was pretty disappointing.”

South Africa have appealed du Plessis being found guilty of tampering, and losing his match fee saying law 42.3 is unclear in its definition of what constitutes an artificial substance.

Du Plessis was found to have used saliva modified by a sweet to polish the ball in the second test.

In appealing, South Africa has said law 42.3 is unclear in its definition of what constitutes an artificial substance.

But the International Cricket Council (ICC) said it is “disappointed” with the appeal.

Chief executive David Richardson in Adelaide emphasised his organisation’s understanding of the fair-and unfair-play laws.

“These state that a player should not use artificial substances to shine the ball,” he said in a statement.

“The ICC understands that to include, but is not limited to, sunscreen, lip ice and residue from sweets.”

While the ICC “does not wish to prevent players from using these substances for legitimate purposes … any deliberate attempt to apply such substances to the ball, as was the case here, will not be acceptable.”

Richardson did not rule out the possibility that the law could be changed, but stressed that until such an amendment, the laws in their current form would be applied.

 – AAP

Nov 252016
 
Booing Faf du Plessis went too far - Australian cricket boss James Sutherland

Last updated 18:43, November 25 2016

South Africa captain Faf du Plessis was disappointed with the crowd reaction to his century in Adelaide.

JASON REED/REUTERS

South Africa captain Faf du Plessis was disappointed with the crowd reaction to his century in Adelaide.

Fans went too far by booing South African captain Faf du Plessis’ century, Cricket Australia chief executive James Sutherland says.

Du Plessis was jeered by the Adelaide Oval crowd throughout his ton against Australia in the third Test on Thursday, and particularly when he reached the milestone.

The Proteas’ skipper said he expected some hostility after being found guilty by the International Cricket Council of ball tampering.

Faf du Plessis in thought during his press conference on Wednesday.

Ryan Pierse/Getty Images

Faf du Plessis in thought during his press conference on Wednesday.

But he was disappointed the booing continued when he scored his century – and Sutherland agreed.

READ MORE:
The art of ball tampering: How to give bowlers an advantage on the cricket field
Full coverage: Black Caps v Pakistan – second test
Scorecard: Black Caps v Pakistan – second test
Black Caps eye series win at Seddon Park
Sneak peek: Seddon Park pitch
Hamilton hot shots, the stars of Seddon Park
Ferguson poised for Black Caps call

“It’s a little bit of theatrics … he batted beautifully and I don’t think he deserved any boos after a great hundred like that,” Sutherland told ABC radio on Friday.

“That is sport and maybe just a little bit of fun that people in the crowd are having.

“But perhaps that fun just went a little bit too far at the end.”

Du Plessis will appeal his ball-tampering verdict, which resulted in a fine of his entire match fee from the second Test and three demerit points.

“I was expecting a little bit of hostility but not to that extent,” du Plessis told reporters after play on Thursday night.

“When I came out, I was obviously quite aware of it. As the innings went on, it disappeared a bit.

“But to be really honest with you guys, when I got to 100, I wasn’t expecting to still get booed. So that was pretty disappointing.”

South Africa have appealed du Plessis being found guilty of tampering, and losing his match fee saying law 42.3 is unclear in its definition of what constitutes an artificial substance.

Du Plessis was found to have used saliva modified by a sweet to polish the ball in the second test.

In appealing, South Africa has said law 42.3 is unclear in its definition of what constitutes an artificial substance.

But the International Cricket Council (ICC) said it is “disappointed” with the appeal.

Chief executive David Richardson in Adelaide emphasised his organisation’s understanding of the fair-and unfair-play laws.

“These state that a player should not use artificial substances to shine the ball,” he said in a statement.

“The ICC understands that to include, but is not limited to, sunscreen, lip ice and residue from sweets.”

While the ICC “does not wish to prevent players from using these substances for legitimate purposes … any deliberate attempt to apply such substances to the ball, as was the case here, will not be acceptable.”

Richardson did not rule out the possibility that the law could be changed, but stressed that until such an amendment, the laws in their current form would be applied.

 – AAP

Nov 252016
 
Black Caps set to unleash new speedster Lockie Ferguson on Australia

IAN ANDERSON

Last updated 17:37, November 25 2016

Lockie Ferguson has been named in the New Zealand squad for the one-day series against Australia next month.

PHOTOSPORT

Lockie Ferguson has been named in the New Zealand squad for the one-day series against Australia next month.

Calling him the new Shane Bond would be horrifyingly overblown.

But there’s no doubt New Zealand want to unleash rising quick bowler Lockie Ferguson on Australia in the three-game Chappell-Hadlee Trophy series next month.

The 25-year-old Aucklander is the new face in the Black Caps for the ODI series and New Zealand selector Gavin Larsen admitted they see the right-armer as the man to hurry up the Australian batsmen.

Trent Boult has been named in the ODI squad after missing the second test for New Zealand against Pakistan with a knee ...

PHOTOSPORT

Trent Boult has been named in the ODI squad after missing the second test for New Zealand against Pakistan with a knee injury.

“He bowls consistently in the 140s [kph] and he clicks over 150 every now and then,” Larsen said.

READ MORE:

Full coverage: Black Caps v Pakistan – second test
Scorecard: Black Caps v Pakistan – second test
Black Caps eye series win at Seddon Park
Sneak peek: Seddon Park pitch
Hamilton hot shots, the stars of Seddon Park
Ferguson poised for Black Caps call

“So there is some real gas to Lockie Ferguson. There’s an element of surprise, and batsmen don’t like playing guys with that sort of pace.”

Luke Ronchi has lost his place in the Black Caps' ODI team with BJ Watling getting the nod as gloveman.

GETTY IMAGES

Luke Ronchi has lost his place in the Black Caps’ ODI team with BJ Watling getting the nod as gloveman.

Bond rattled the Australian batsmen in an ODI series across the ditch in 2002 and with Ferguson being notably quicker than Tim Southee, Trent Boult and Matt Henry, he should be offered the opportunity to try and rattle a relatively inexperienced host side.

“He bowls with pace and with Milney [Adam Milne] not available through his own series of injuries that he’s attempting to come back from,Lockie to us was the obvious guy to step up,” Larsen said.

“Importantly for us, he’s done the job at domestic level. He’s really stepped up and he’s led the Auckland attack in all three forms of cricket and deserves his selection.”

“We felt on balance that at some stage through this summer we would like to expose Lockie and I guess in a way he’s fast-tracked himself through his performances.”

Boult has been named in the 14-man squad despite missing the second test against Pakistan which started in Hamilton on Friday through a knee injury.

“We’ve had good solid medical advice that the issue Trent’s had with his knee is a short-term one,” Larsen said.

Colin de Grandhomme – who starred on his test debut but is better known as a punishing limited-overs allrounder – and Colin Munro are newcomers to the squad that played five ODIs in India, while Todd Astle replaces Ish Sodhi as the leg-spinning option.

“He [Astle] offers us good all-round balance but primarily he’s been picked as a legspinner,” Larsen said.

“The runs he could score down numbers eight or nine could be invaluable. We’ve just felt that Ish has been a little inconsistent and he’s returning to ND and working very hard on his game.”

BJ Watling hs won the wicketkeeper’s role over Luke Ronchi after the Wellington veteran again failed to fire with the bat in the initial one-dayers in India.

Among the “unavailable through injury” list is allrounder Corey Anderson, who has had to withdrawn from the Northern Districts first-class side with ongoing back problems that have restricted his ability to bowl.

“We want Corey to be bowling,” said Larsen, admitting that another injury spell was a a concern for the 25-year-old, NZ selectors and fans.

“It’s frustrating that we’re having to deal with it continually and talk about Corey’s back. We’re going to give Corey every opportunity to come right – it’s a long summer.”

Larsen said despite Australia’s struggles in the test series to date against Australia, he predicts the trans-Tasman rivals will be out to continue their ascendancy against the Kiwis.

“I expect them to come hard at us. I expect them to be ruthless, I think they’ll be hurting and I think they’ll want to put us away.”

The squad leaves for Australia on Wednesday after the second test against Pakistan, with the first match on Sunday 4 December.

New Zealand squad for the Chappell-Hadlee Trophy series: Kane Williamson (c), Todd Astle, Trent Boult, Lockie Ferguson, Martin Guptill, Colin de Grandhomme, Matt Henry, Tom Latham, Colin Munro, Jimmy Neesham, Henry Nicholls, Mitchell Santner, Tim Southee, BJ Watling.



 – Stuff

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