Apr 152014
 

Published: 7:18AM Wednesday April 16, 2014 Source: Fairfax

Corey Anderson will require clearance from New Zealand Cricket’s medical staff before making his Indian Premier League debut.

The $866,000 allrounder is preparing with his Mumbai Indians team in Abu Dhabi, ahead of tomorrow’s tournament opener but won’t play until NZC is satisfied he’s over the dislocated little finger suffered at the World Twenty20 on April 1.

”They [Mumbai] have got to assess him on a daily basis but it’s more a four-week injury when it could have been an eight-week injury. They’re in communication with our medical team and when he shows he’s fully fit he will be selected,” New Zealand coach Mike Hesson said.

Hesson will be keeping a close eye on the subcontinent in the next six weeks as his West Indies Test squad members Anderson, Brendon McCullum (Chennai), Ross Taylor, Jimmy Neesham (both Delhi) and Tim Southee (Rajasthan) turn out in the IPL which begins in Abu Dhabi and Dubai before returning to India in May after the country’s general elections.

New Zealand’s IPL players will be late arrivals in the Caribbean and are allowed to remain in India till their team is eliminated.

The IPL round robin finishes on May 26 and the final is on June 2, with the first test against the West Indies starting in Kingston, Jamaica on June 9.

”They will be available for our last warmup match [a three-dayer from June 3-5]. They’ll be playing a lot of spin over there [in India], whether it be in the nets, they’ll be well prepared. It actually flows quite nicely into the tour,” Hesson said.

The sixth New Zealander, Canterbury paceman Matt Henry, joins McCullum at the Stephen Fleming-coached Chennai but is still recovering from a side strain that sidelined him since his impressive ODI debut against India on January 31.

Bookmakers have the New Zealand coached sides; Chennai, Mumbai (John Wright) and Bangalore (Daniel Vettori) as the three most favoured.

Mumbai are defending champions, after beating Chennai in last year’s final. Fleming admitted there were ”a lot of distractions” as his team assembled.

The franchise has been on shaky ground ever since one of its officials, Gurunath Meiyappan, who is also the son-in-law of BCCI president N Srinivasan – the vice-chairman and managing director of India Cements, the company that owns Super Kings – was arrested on charges of cheating, forgery and fraud two days before the IPL 2013 final, amid the spot-fixing crisis.

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Apr 072014
 
Cricket Wellington supports NZC's bold initiative

A piece of James Franklin and Michael Pollard might one day be yours – for the right price.

Cricket Wellington (CW) strongly supports a discussion document, tabled by New Zealand Cricket (NZC), which could lead to the franchising of the Firebirds and this country’s five other major association sides.

CW chief executive Peter Clinton does not want to see domestic cricket’s stocks fall any further and would happily sell a 49 per cent stake in his flagship team to appropriate private investors.

Plenty needs to happen for NZC’s proposal to become a reality, but CW won’t sit on their hands in the meantime.

“Would anyone be interested [in investing]? Depending on how you pitch it and what it looks like and who you go to, I’d like to think there’d be some interest,” Clinton said.

“But I’d rather go out there and ask that question than sit here and not ask it at all.”

It would certainly take special investors to get involved with a product that, as it stands, makes no money and might not at any time in the future.

Ron Brierley has been a silent CW benefactor for some time, while Clinton mentioned Gareth Morgan as another individual who has supported sporting franchises in Wellington.

“You need someone who wants to see Wellington sport do well, is a cricket fan, is in there for the long term and is prepared to not just contribute financially, but in terms of advice and networks,” Clinton said.

“If you do those things, that would increase interest in the game and get fans along to the game and give them a really fantastic experience, then we’ve got a real recipe for success there.”

Clinton believes in the strength of the product and the notion that it’s well followed, if not well attended. But without outside investment and expertise, he fears domestic cricket will be watched by fewer and fewer people and continue to have to be fully funded by NZC.

“The discussion paper would have the Firebirds as they are, across all [three] formats, but the idea would be for them to be a fully professional sports team which has its own governance and manages its own internal budget and looks after itself and its strategic objectives,” he said.

That kind of model exists to some extent now.

The Firebirds’ finances are separate from those of CW and its amateur arm, even if it all comes out of the same pot.

So when you take money from NZC and allocate it to captain Franklin and company, you do it at the expense of the kids playing school cricket on Happy Valley No 1.

A stand alone franchise, bankrolled by private owners and NZC, would enable CW to do away with what Clinton called “internal conflicts” about who gets what.

The unresolved issue is what major associations could offer investors in return, given Twenty20 cricket is basically the only format that garners television coverage and that’s piecemeal anyway.

“Broadcasting rights, for most sports clubs and teams around the world, that’s the majority of their income and the most attractive property they have.

“So we’ve got to be very clear about what exactly a major association might own and what’s available to sell,” said Clinton.

“But if we take it back to something as simple as gate receipts, if we had more resources to market and profile the domestic game could we actually increase our gate receipts markedly?

If we were able to do that, then we’d obviously be able to get a dividend or we’d be able to funnel that return back into the professional game again and slowly build it up.”

– © Fairfax NZ News

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Feb 102014
 
Bracewell & Ryder Fined For Misconduct
Monday 10 February 2014 

Doug Bracewell

Doug Bracewell and Jesse Ryder have been fined for misconduct

REUTERS / Action Images

New Zealand internationals Doug Bracewell and Jesse Ryder have been fined by New Zealand Cricket (NZC) for misconduct after a late-night drinking session.

The pair, neither of whom were selected for the opening Test against India in Auckland, were out until 3am in the morning.

NZC confirmed that the players have accepted a misconduct charge and paid fines of an undisclosed amount.

“The New Zealand selectors place great emphasis on qualities such as personal responsibility, trustworthiness and dependability – and will continue to do so with our encouragement,” NZC Head of Cricket Operations Lindsay Crocker said.
 
“All players in contention for the BLACKCAPS need to satisfy the selectors of their commitment to prepare conscientiously for international fixtures.”

While Bracewell was named in the squad before being left out in favour of Tim Southee, Trent Boult and Neil Wagner, Ryder was involved as a standby player with Ross Taylor’s partner due to give birth shortly.

“We’ve told Doug that he needs to take responsibility for what happens around him and that he needs to do all he can to ensure his preparation for international cricket is not compromised.”

Mike Sandle, NZC, March 2013

“We’ve told Doug that he needs to take responsibility for what happens around him and that he needs to do all he can to ensure his preparation for international cricket is not compromised,” – See more at: http://www.cricketworld.com/bracewell-ruled-out-butler-wagner-in-contention/33591.htm#sthash.92oxmlOY.dpuf

Ryder made a remarkable return to the game and played during the One-Day International series win over India less than a year after being attacked in Christchurch and suffering life-threatening injuries.

However, what is the latest in a series of off-field incidents appears to have thrown considerable doubt over his immediate international future.

Bracewell, like Ryder, does not boast of an impeccable record. In March last year, he was ruled out of matches against England after cutting his foot while cleaning up after a party.

New Zealand went on to win the first Test by 40 runs and will name their squad for the second game in Wellington shortly.

© Cricket World 2014

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Feb 092014
 
Jesse Ryder dumped from Test squad

Published: 6:53AM Monday February 10, 2014 Source: ONE News/Fairfax

Black Caps coach Mike Hesson has confirmed that troubled batsman Jesse Ryder has been dropped from the Test squad.

Ryder scored a century in a Plunket Shield match for Otago on Saturday, but a series of incidents with partner in crime Doug Bracewell, has seen his Test hopes cut short after the Black Caps beat India by 40-runs in the first Test at Eden Park yesterday.

“We’ll be naming our second Test side tomorrow or maybe later on today and neither Jesse Ryder nor Doug Bracewell will be available for selection,” Hesson told media today.

Bracewell suffered an injury in an alleged scuffle during the pair’s night out last week but Ryder’s dumping is a completely to do with his behaviour.

NZC chief executive David White is expected to provide an update today as to whether the pair will be charged under the code of conduct after both admitted being at an Auckland bar just hours before the start of the first Test against India on Thursday.

Neither was named in the playing 11 but had remained with the squad as cover.

“I think that we won a Test yesterday and the fact that the first few questions (at the press conference) are based around off-field incidents is clearly an extreme disappointment for the team. It takes away from a superb effort over the past four days,” Hesson said.

Black Caps security manager Sam Dickason is still piecing together the events of the night, which is complicated by Ryder currently playing for Otago and Bracewell being back home in Napier with a confirmed broken bone in his foot.

NZC are investigating reports Bracewell suffered other injuries on the night, and there are questions as to whether he was involved in a fight. As of last night, no complaint had been laid by any member of the public.

As it stands, the pair’s actions are not considered worthy of tearing up their respective contracts. Bracewell is one of NZC’s 20 contracted players, and Ryder is contracted to Otago, for whom he scored 100 not out against Central Districts in Nelson yesterday despite the drama swirling around him.

Ryder, though, looks to be nearing his last chance with coach Mike Hesson who along with senior players was understood to be fuming when news broke on Friday of the pair’s night out on test eve.

NZC originally hoped to name their 15-strong World Twenty20 squad on Wednesday but are likely to push it back to later in the week, before the Sunday deadline for squads to be announced.

Ryder was described yesterday as 50-50 to make that side as patience wears thin at his regular drinking exploits. His chances of snaring an Indian Premier League contract at Wednesday’s player auction have also plummeted, with teams wary of taking a risk on someone with off-field form.

Ryder’s long-time manager and friend, Aaron Klee, parted ways with his troublesome charge on Friday night. Klee declined to comment yesterday but it is understood he is definitely no longer Ryder’s manager after finally losing patience with his alcohol-fuelled off-field dramas.

Hesson, captain Brendon McCullum and NZC now have to decide if Ryder is such a valuable asset that they are willing to make concessions. If he is welcomed back into the Black Caps’ fold, it will almost certainly be on the proviso he stays away from alcohol.

Details emerged at the weekend of another big night out, after the tied ODI in Auckland on January 25. NZC confirmed reports that a drunk Ryder was assisted into a taxi at 3am by team-mate Jimmy Neesham, who was out with Ryder and was asked by team management to keep an eye on him.

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Jan 222014
 
NZ Cricket confident of future 'big-three' tours

New Zealand Cricket continues to insist it can lock in regular tours by the big three nations amid howls of protest about the proposed revamp of the International Cricket Council’s structure.

NZC board member and chief negotiator Martin Snedden reiterated his positive forecast after a phone hookup with fellow directors yesterday, and rejected concerns New Zealand would be cast into the international cricket wilderness.

Meanwhile, Cricket South Africa labelled the ICC’s finance and commercial affairs committee’s draft “position paper”, which cedes control to India, England and Australia, as unconstitutional. If it is deemed a “special resolution”, to be passed it requires eight of the 10 full members to vote for it.

FICA, the international players’ association, said it was “extremely concerned” about the future of international cricket and called on the other seven full ICC members to reject the proposal at next week’s executive meeting in Dubai.

The 21-page document proposes scrapping the Future Tours Programme, which underpins a fair chunk of NZC’s income from television rights, notably from the current tour by world powerhouses India. Tours would be bilaterally agreed and no team would be forced to host “uneconomic tours”.

“The result of this is that the gap between the ‘big three’ and the rest will get bigger and bigger, which will undermine the competitiveness of future ICC events and therefore the value of rights in future cycles,” the FICA statement said.

“This will affect everyone and it cannot possibly be in the interests of international cricket, nor of the health and sustainability of the world game of which the ICC is supposed to be the custodian.”

Snedden will head to Dubai with NZC chief executive David White this weekend for negotiations with other member nations, before the executive meeting starting on Tuesday. Behind the scenes discussions have already begun.

“There’s been a lot of comment in recent days about the FTP being chucked out the window, and some sort of bilateral process will come in its place and all the smaller countries will be relegated and the big guys playing against each other and every so often throwing a crumb in our direction,” Snedden said.

“I don’t believe that is actually what’s been intended here. Part of what we are doing in Dubai is drawing out of the three countries exactly what is intended and trying to ensure that the end result is that we have a binding playing schedule for the Black Caps pretty much in accordance with what’s on the table with the FTP at the moment.”

Snedden saw the proposal as a starting point for negotiations, not a locked in document. He felt a quality home and away schedule was achievable and believed India, England and Australia would still be willing to enter into bilateral agreements with NZC, notably for inbound tours which are the most lucrative for the host.

“There is more appeal [to touring New Zealand] than people are giving it credit for. I think as part of this overall proposal they are going to commit to coming to New Zealand and they are going to commit to hosting us.

“I want to ensure that when we get to the detail of that, we’re talking about reciprocal tours within a four-year time frame that involves a test and ODI and T20 mix that is pretty much the same as what we’ve got on the table right now.”

Snedden and White will head to Dubai with five key guidelines from the NZC board, all of which challenge the ICC’s proposal.

They are: a workable governance system at the ICC; ratification of the existing FTP schedule through to 2020, with the hope of extending it to 2023; confirmation of the current ICC events schedule (World Cups and World T20) through to 2023; a firm commitment from India to the FTP and ICC events schedule; and an ICC revenue sharing model “that guarantees strong growth of NZC’s revenue for the 2016-23 period”.

Snedden supported the formula around the proposed revenue sharing model. It proposes India receive 63 percent of what is set aside for “contribution costs”, while New Zealand and most of the other nations get around two percent of this.

“I understand how it’s constructed and we’re accepting that India is going to take a much bigger slice of the pie and we’re not resisting that.”

The former NZC chief executive has faced some challenges before but wouldn’t label this his toughest.

“I’m going in with my eyes open and pretty motivated to get us to that end position that we need. I’m not worried or scared by the process, I’m looking forward to it and it’ll be good being in Dubai and getting stuck into face-to-face discussions.”

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Jan 222014
 
Snedden rejects NZ will live off cricket 'crumbs'

New Zealand Cricket continues to insist it can lock in regular tours by the big three nations amid howls of protest about the proposed revamp of the International Cricket Council’s structure.

NZC board member and chief negotiator Martin Snedden reiterated his positive forecast after a phone hookup with fellow directors yesterday, and rejected concerns New Zealand would be cast into the international cricket wilderness.

Meanwhile, Cricket South Africa labelled the ICC’s finance and commercial affairs committee’s draft “position paper”, which cedes control to India, England and Australia, as unconstitutional. If it is deemed a “special resolution”, to be passed it requires eight of the 10 full members to vote for it.

FICA, the international players’ association, said it was “extremely concerned” about the future of international cricket and called on the other seven full ICC members to reject the proposal at next week’s executive meeting in Dubai.

The 21-page document proposes scrapping the Future Tours Programme, which underpins a fair chunk of NZC’s income from television rights, notably from the current tour by world powerhouses India. Tours would be bilaterally agreed and no team would be forced to host “uneconomic tours”.

“The result of this is that the gap between the ‘big three’ and the rest will get bigger and bigger, which will undermine the competitiveness of future ICC events and therefore the value of rights in future cycles,” the FICA statement said.

“This will affect everyone and it cannot possibly be in the interests of international cricket, nor of the health and sustainability of the world game of which the ICC is supposed to be the custodian.”

Snedden will head to Dubai with NZC chief executive David White this weekend for negotiations with other member nations, before the executive meeting starting on Tuesday. Behind the scenes discussions have already begun.

“There’s been a lot of comment in recent days about the FTP being chucked out the window, and some sort of bilateral process will come in its place and all the smaller countries will be relegated and the big guys playing against each other and every so often throwing a crumb in our direction,” Snedden said.

“I don’t believe that is actually what’s been intended here. Part of what we are doing in Dubai is drawing out of the three countries exactly what is intended and trying to ensure that the end result is that we have a binding playing schedule for the Black Caps pretty much in accordance with what’s on the table with the FTP at the moment.”

Snedden saw the proposal as a starting point for negotiations, not a locked in document. He felt a quality home and away schedule was achievable and believed India, England and Australia would still be willing to enter into bilateral agreements with NZC, notably for inbound tours which are the most lucrative for the host.

“There is more appeal [to touring New Zealand] than people are giving it credit for. I think as part of this overall proposal they are going to commit to coming to New Zealand and they are going to commit to hosting us.

“I want to ensure that when we get to the detail of that, we’re talking about reciprocal tours within a four-year time frame that involves a test and ODI and T20 mix that is pretty much the same as what we’ve got on the table right now.”

Snedden and White will head to Dubai with five key guidelines from the NZC board, all of which challenge the ICC’s proposal.

They are: a workable governance system at the ICC; ratification of the existing FTP schedule through to 2020, with the hope of extending it to 2023; confirmation of the current ICC events schedule (World Cups and World T20) through to 2023; a firm commitment from India to the FTP and ICC events schedule; and an ICC revenue sharing model “that guarantees strong growth of NZC’s revenue for the 2016-23 period”.

Snedden supported the formula around the proposed revenue sharing model. It proposes India receive 63 percent of what is set aside for “contribution costs”, while New Zealand and most of the other nations get around two percent of this.

“I understand how it’s constructed and we’re accepting that India is going to take a much bigger slice of the pie and we’re not resisting that.”

The former NZC chief executive has faced some challenges before but wouldn’t label this his toughest.

“I’m going in with my eyes open and pretty motivated to get us to that end position that we need. I’m not worried or scared by the process, I’m looking forward to it and it’ll be good being in Dubai and getting stuck into face-to-face discussions.”

– © Fairfax NZ News

Jan 222014
 
NZ Cricket reveal key concerns over ICC proposal

Published: 6:08PM Wednesday January 22, 2014 Source: ONE Sport

The stoush developing over the control of the international game has reached the New Zealand Cricket boardroom.

The NZC board was briefed today on India, Australia and England’s planned takeover of future tour schedules, and NZC board member Martin Snedden says they have key concerns they want addressed when the full world executive meets in Dubai next week.

“The key things we are looking for are a stable playing programme in international cricket, both in terms of bilateral arrangements between two countries, and also in terms of ICC events through to 2023, and we need a revenue sharing model that enables our revenues to be growing during that same period of time,” Snedden told ONE Sport today.

Snedden was hesitant to describe the board’s reaction to today’s briefing and reiterated that this is merely the beginning of a negotiation process which could stretch out until April or May.

“It’s really just the start of a process,” Snedden said.

“Not all of the information is on the table or completely clear at the moment so part of what we are doing in our discussions with other countries and with ICC is trying to draw out the specific detail around some of these proposals that may not at the moment be crystal clear.”

Snedden added it was important not to assume the worst this early on and said NZC would be working to assure New Zealand’s continued involvement in an international programme at least similar to what they have now.

“Don’t get caught up in a frenzy about the proposal but actually step back and say ‘how can we move it towards an end result?’,” he said.

“And if we can head this negotiation to an end result which results in the Black Caps having an international playing programme that’s very similar or the same as what they’ve got now, then that’s one really good outcome of this process.”

The full world executive meets in Dubai next week to further discuss the issue, and could vote on a change then.

To ensure the takeover, under the ICC constitution, eight out of the 10 cricketing nations need to vote in favour of the new proposal.

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Jan 212014
 
ICC News: CSA expresses concern over proposed ICC two-tier proposal while NZC Chief non-chalenty sides with the Powerful Trio

Cricket South Africa has become the first board to publically demand withdrawal of the unjust ICC Two – tier system proposal. According to the draft, the future of international cricket, which comprises of  Ten full member nations, thirty-seven associate and sixty affiliate member nations,  would be in the hands of three boards; namely India, England and Australia.

The proposal was drawn up by a working group of ICC’s Finance & Commercial Affairs Committee (F&CA) that has its reigns led by the BCCI, CA and ECB. The meeting where the proposal was put forth was an unscheduled meeting that ‘came out of nowehere’ according to the head of Bangladesh Cricket Board, Nazm ul Hasan. Hasan relented that his board was hapless to do anything on its own.

Tony Irish, Chief Executive South Africa Cricketers Association has defined the document as ‘concerning’ warned that it will have ‘significant implication for cricket particularly for the smaller countries.

Being the first to openly express their concern over the unconventional idea, CSA has sent an open letter to ICC Full Members and media outlets asking them to reconsider and withdraw the proposal. “In the circumstances we propose that the draft proposal be withdrawn immediately given that the proper procedures have not been followed.”

The letter reminds F&CA Committee that the proposal shall require a large proportion of changes in ICC constitution and amendments.  “Without addressing the merits of the proposal insofar as it concerns Constitutional amendments and changes to ICC competitions, these proposals should first be referred to the relevant ICC committees or sub-committees for proper consideration and to make recommendations to the ICC Board.”

 “Although there is nothing to prevent a review of the ICC funding model or finances, the proposal self-evidently is inextricably tied up with a fundamental restructuring of the ICC, which has far-reaching Constitutional implications,” the open letter further states. “The draft proposal is, therefore, fundamentally flawed as regards the process and, therefore, in breach of the ICC Constitution.”

CSA President Alan Isaac, who is the sender of the letter, spoke on behalf of the board of Directors of CSA. “In our respectful opinion, a more considered, inclusive/consultative, and properly Constitutionally-ordained approach is required.”

Thus far only New Zealand Cricket Director Martin Snedden seems not baffled by the proposal. His reason being New Zealand Cricket, despite being a full member, has no say in ICC matter anyway. “Do we [NZC] have power at the ICC table? No, not a hell of a lot. Do we have the ability to influence and persuade? A little bit. The critical thing is to identify the things most important to us. That means ensuring the stability of our playing program and revenue generation,” Snedden told the New Zealand Herald.

The position paper is due to be put  forward to the ICC Executive Board at its quarterly meeting in Dubai on January 28th – 29th.  The proposal will need seven votes out of ten to be implemented.

Jan 182014
 
NZC slammed for support of ICC takeover bid

New Zealand’s apparent support of a takeover of the International Cricket Council by India, Australia and England has been strongly criticised.

After details of the takeover plan, which would put control of the ICC in the hands of the three nations emerged yesterday, New Zealand Cricket was forced to quell speculation that it stood to lose millions of dollars if those big three got their way.

But rather than coming across as an unwilling victim of what the New Zealand Cricket Players Association called “scheming” by the Indians, Australians and English, NZC gave a strong impression it supported the revolution.

It issued a short statement under the name of high-profile board member Martin Snedden, who travelled to Dubai with CEO David White for an ICC meeting where the scheme was unveiled. The statement claimed New Zealand would not be “disadvantaged” or the Black Caps “downgraded” under any “changes that are currently proposed”.

Snedden and White refused to comment any further publicly, citing “strict” confidentiality provisions from the meeting where the boards of the three big nations revealed a 21-page document which advocates scrapping the Future Tours Programme (FTP).

The NZC statement seemed to be designed to quash speculation the Black Caps would be relegated to a second tier of test cricketing nations who would rarely play the big three or host them on tours here.

The FTP, the brainchild of former NZC chairman Sir John Anderson and former CEO, the late Chris Doig, is the cornerstone of international cricket funding and guarantees the high-profile nations must tour lesser nations such as New Zealand.

The big three’s proposed document states that no member nation should be forced to play another, except as bilaterally agreed, while no country should be forced to host “uneconomic tours”.

Sources told the Sunday Star-Times last night that NZC will back the takeover and changes after being offered a “sweetener” of more money than it could make from the FTP and the promise the Black Caps will still play India, Australia and England as often as they do now.

But the deal has been criticised by national players’ association boss Heath Mills and ex-test cricketer John Morrison.

Mills admitted concern about the developments, saying his association knew little detail of them.

“[But] I do know that in the past six months you’ve had the heads of English cricket, Australian cricket and Indian cricket meeting quite regularly and scheming to put a new system in place to control the game, so I’m worried,” he said on radio yesterday.

“I don’t see how you can be supportive of the heads of three boards conducting meetings without you knowing, talking about how they want the game to be structured.

“As it appears to me, the (ICC) decision-making process is effectively being handed over to three boards who rotate the chairmanship and are soon to be making every decision.

“I think that’s alarming. If we want the game to grow globally, we need to have independent thinking about how we grow the game.

‘What I’ve sensed in the last six months is you’ve got three organisations that are attempting to control the decision-making, and they will get other people over the line by throwing them some smaller increases in revenue.

“We’ve just had ten Ashes test matches in a row. We’ll just end up with a situation where the three biggest countries play each other more than other countries. Whilst we might get a little bit more revenue from the global share, I doubt they’ll be keen to come down here too often.”

Morrison agreed and said the restructuring of the ICC restructure was potentially “sad and dangerous” for New Zealand and could still turn the country into a “second division” cricketing nation.

He said he was concerned NZC had a “beneficiary mentality” and challenged it to win boardroom power via the performance of the Black Caps in the series against India, starting with today’s one-day international in Napier.

“There’s no use having the mentality of ‘give us this, give us that’,” he said. “That’s a beneficiary mentality. You want to control your own destiny and step up and say ‘we can foot it on the world stage and we want to be there’.”

Morrison said the FTP had “worked quite well” for New Zealand – the last tour by India five years ago reaped a $25 million payday for the NZC and the present tour will at least match that despite its being shortened at India’s behest.

Former NZC boss Justin Vaughan, who ran the organisation when the FTP was implemented, also expressed concern, saying changing the present revenue-sharing model would leave world cricket “worse off”.

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