Mar 252014
 

Shane Shillingford

Shane Shillingford is free to resume bowling again although he will not bowl his doosra, which remains an illegal delivery

© REUTERS / Action Images

West Indies off-spinner Shane Shillingford will be allowed to bowl in international cricket after an independent test has found his bowling action to be legal.

Shillingford was reported and subsequently banned from bowling after the West Indies toured India in November.

He has since undergone remedial work on his action and passed an independent test on his off-break and arm balls.

International Cricket Council regulations allow no more than 15 degrees of elbow extension.

However, his doosra does not pass the same test and he will not be allowed to bowl it, Shillingford confirming to the ICC that he will not do so.

He was reported at the end of the second day’s play during the second and final Test in Mumbai and was tested on 29th November at the University of Western Australia.

All of his deliveries – off-break, arm ball and doosra – were deemed to be illegal and he was banned from bowling.

It was the second time that he had been banned. He was first banned between November 2010 and June 2011.

He has played 14 Tests for the West Indies, taking 65 wickets at an average of 32.32 with six five-wicket hauls.

© Cricket World 2014

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Dec 182013
 
Windies in spin over Shillingford's dismissal

Published: 6:40AM Thursday December 19, 2013 Source: Fairfax

Shane Shillingford bowls against the Black Caps (Source: Photosport)

Shane Shillingford bowls against the Black Caps – Source: Photosport

If this was Darren Sammy’s best “no comment”, then here’s hoping he really marks out his run at some stage this tour.

A hurt and bemused West Indies side turned up at Seddon Park yesterday, still trying to digest the suspension of their best bowler, Shane Shillingford.

The spinner failed to convince an independent panel in Perth that his bowling arm was within the permitted 15 degrees (from the point the arm raises above the shoulder to the point of delivery) and is banned until he can do so.

West Indies coach Ottis Gibson offered the most telling line on the topic, two days before Shillingford’s ban was confirmed by the International Cricket Council.

“There are a few people around the world bowling with similar, if not worse actions, so I expect him to be cleared.”

Sammy is an impressive captain, who gives respectful, considered answers with a dose of good humour. But this time, it was all he could do to remain silent when asked if he agreed with Gibson.

“I guess the coach has his opinions. I’d love to spill my guts out and say what I have to say.

“Wouldn’t you love that?”

Instead, Sammy said he would stick by the rules for fear of finding himself in a “compromising situation”.

He felt for close friend Shillingford, who needed to be home with close family and would be on a plane to Dominica in the next few days.

The tourists are right to feel hard done by. Chucking is one of the worst labels a bowler can be tarred with and 30-year-old Shillingford’s career is now under a cloud, after being banned for a second time.

The on-field umpires reported his action as suspect during the Tests in India last month.

Meanwhile, as Gibson noted, others around the world continue on.

Most countries have bowlers whose actions raise eyebrows, and even New Zealand’s part-time offie, Kane Williamson, bowls in long sleeves with a jerky delivery, but has never had official concerns raised in his career.

New Zealand captain Brendon McCullum had sympathy for Shillingford, but wouldn’t say whether he believed he was hard done by.

“I guess you always feel sorry for someone if they get rubbed out of a game, regardless of the situation, so I feel for him.

“But it’s the nature of the game and it’s not really for us to comment on.”

Copyright © 2013, Television New Zealand Limited. Breaking and Daily News, Sport & Weather | TV ONE, TV2 | Ondemand

Dec 182013
 
West Indies in spin over Shane Shillingford ban

If this was Darren Sammy’s best “no comment”, then here’s hoping he really marks out his run at some stage this tour.

A hurt and bemused West Indies side turned up at Seddon Park yesterday, still trying to digest the suspension of their best bowler, Shane Shillingford. The spinner failed to convince an independent panel in Perth that his bowling arm was within the permitted 15 degrees (from the point the arm raises above the shoulder to the point of delivery), and is banned until he can do so.

West Indies coach Ottis Gibson offered the most telling line on the topic, two days before Shillingford’s ban was confirmed by the International Cricket Council. “There are a few people around the world bowling with similar, if not worse actions, so I expect him to be cleared.”

Sammy is an impressive captain who gives respectful, considered answers with a dose of good humour. But this time it was all he could do to remain silent when asked if he agreed with Gibson.

“I guess the coach has his opinions. I’d love to spill my guts out and say what I have to say. Wouldn’t you love that?”

Instead, Sammy said he would stick by the rules for fear of finding himself in a “compromising situation”.

He felt for his close friend Shillingford, who needed to be home with close family and would be on a plane to Dominica in the next few days.

The tourists are right to feel hard done by. Chucking is one of the worst labels a bowler can be tarred with, and 30-year-old Shillingford’s career is now under a cloud after being banned for a second time. The on-field umpires reported his action as suspect during the tests in India last month.

Meanwhile, as Gibson noted, others around the world continue on. Most countries have bowlers whose actions raise eyebrows, and even New Zealand’s part-time offie, Kane Williamson, bowls in long sleeves with a jerky delivery but has never had official concerns raised in his career.

New Zealand captain Brendon McCullum had sympathy for Shillingford but wouldn’t say whether he believed he was hard done by.

“I guess you always feel sorry for someone if they get rubbed out of a game regardless of the situation so I feel for him. But it’s the nature of the game and it’s not really for us to comment on.”

– © Fairfax NZ News

Dec 162013
 
Shillingford Suspended, Samuels Restricted
Monday 16 December 2013 

by John Pennington

Shane Shillingford, Marlon Samuels, Shivnarine Chanderpaul

Shane Shillingford (centre) has been suspended from bowling in international cricket and Marlon Samuels (left) cannot bowl his quicker ball

REUTERS / Action Images

West Indies off-spinner Shane Shillingford has been suspended from bowling in international cricket and team-mate Marlon Samuels has been banned from bowling his quicker ball.

The pair were reported following the second Test against India and travelled to Perth to have their bowling actions independently assessed.

Following assessment, Shillingford’s action has been found to be illegal and Samuels, when bowling his quicker delivery, is also guilty of bending his arm more than the permitted 15 degrees.

Shillingford, who has been suspended from bowling once before, between November 2010 and June 2011, is now unable to bowl until his action has been independently assessed as legal once again.

While Samuels is allowed to bowl in international cricket, he will not be permitted to bowl his quicker delivery.

The independent reports were prepared by Associate Professor Jaque Alderson and the players have the right to appeal, although they must do so in writing within 14 days.

Samuels was also banned from bowling in February 2008 before returning to action in September 2011.

The result of the tests mean that Shillingford will be ruled out of the third and final Test against New Zealand, which begins on 19th December.

© Cricket World 2013

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Dec 092013
 
Shillingford, Samuels face nervous Test
Shane Shillingford delivers, West Indies v Zimbabwe, 2nd Test, Roseau, 1st day, March 21, 2013

Shane Shillingford is awaiting the outcome of tests on his bowling action © WICB Media Photo/Randy Brooks
Enlarge

Shane Shillingford and Marlon Samuels face the prospect of finding out whether their bowling actions have failed testing while they are in the middle of a Test match.

The deadline for the report into their actions passes midway through the Wellington Test against New Zealand and West Indies are waiting to see how the ICC will handle a potentially delicate situation.

The offspinners were tested in Perth on November 29, meaning that the 14-day period for confirmation of the findings being passed to the ICC will end on the third day of the test. The results become official when the ICC releases them via a press release so it is within their control exactly when the information is made public.

Ottis Gibson, the West Indies coach, does not believe it is in anyone’s interest to reveal the results while the players are in the middle, particularly if they are not favourable for either, and hopes to know the outcome either before the match starts or in the days leading up to the final Test in Hamilton.

“I’ve not heard anything from the ICC. Since we’ve done the testing we’ve left it to them,” Gibson said. “They have to digest the report then give us the results. Everything else we do is just focus on cricket.

“The ICC, I suppose, would have an idea of what the findings might say now. The Test starts on Wednesday, it would seem to me if nothing is said before then that they would wait until afterwards. I don’t think it would be fair for them or us to issue the results in the middle of the game. If anything is going to happen I’d prefer if it happened before the game started.”

Shillingford reduced New Zealand to 44 for 4 in their second innings in Dunedin and received praise from his captain, Darren Sammy, for how he had handled himself.

“I didn’t expect anything different from Shillingford,” Sammy said. “We’ve been good mates we’ve been playing for the same first class team in the past decade and I know that he’s a very strong minded individual. He’s been through things like that before.”

Shillingford had his doosra examined during the testing and Samuels his quicker ball after they were reported following the second Test against India in Mumbai. Both players have previously been banned from bowling, Samuels in 2008 and Shillingford following his Test debut in November 2010.

Nov 182013
 
And now back to the cricket

Because time waits for no-one. You might think you can dawdle around, taking things in, but you can’t. Time is ravaging you.

It’s a slow process, but it’s happening all the time. Your pancreas is getting wrinkly; your spleen is going grey; your brain is starting to ache in cold weather. It’s already time to move on. None of us can afford to spend a second day discussing the most culturally significant cricketer who ever lived because there are massively unimportant-yet-current things to discuss, such as the identity of England’s third-seamer for the first Ashes Test.

It’s going to be Chris Tremlett.

Now that discussion’s over, we can move onto Shane Shillingford being reported for a suspect action. As ever with the chucking issue, you need to pick a side and stick to it FOREVER. Changing your mind about anything, ever, is a sign of massive weakness.

You’re not weak are you? No, you’re not. Although as explained above, you’re steadily weakening. You should therefore fully exploit what little remains of your life by launching yourself into petty, pointless ‘debate’. Do it with gusto. It’s what life would be about, if it were about anything. Which it isn’t.

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